Right and wrong.

In Diary of my life after death, Laurie, the narrator, is introduced to the major role that genetic bodies play in determining the human concept of morality.

In the chapter on the difference between right and wrong, the thought is communicated to her that, in genetic terms, good for survival and reproduction is RIGHT, and bad for survival and reproduction is WRONG. She’s told by her guide to note that survival and self-interest play a major role in helping human beings decide whether their behavior is ‘right or wrong’. In spite of human consciousness, physical survival is still a primary factor in the human understanding of morality.

Here’s another excerpt from the book:

I’m at the library to do some gap-filling in my learning program. Spiro says the Elders have decided that before I return to Earth I need a refresher on the major role that a human body plays in helping us decide our morality.

The old librarian takes us to my assigned tutorial screen where I receive the thought that, for genetic organisms, whatever is good for survival and reproduction is RIGHT, and whatever is bad for survival and reproduction is WRONG.

What’s more, this ‘survival morality’ is reinforced for each generation by parents, TV, educators, religious indoctrinators and everyone else that young minds are influenced by.

I’m shown a developing brain with cells and their connections; I watch this brain become more densely packed as the organism grows.

I know that a visiting consciousness arrives in an Earthly body with experiences from previous lives in the form of patterns in its personal energy; the consciousness then has to choose a brain with suitable potential and insinuate these energy patterns into the developing neural network of brain cell connections.

When information begins feeding into this consciousness/brain collaboration from the outside world, I watch a multi-dimensional graphic of this individual’s mental abilities, talents and predilections growing inside their brain.

The incoming information decides how pathways form between brain cells, and how the cells work together. (The earlier and more persistent the incoming information, the deeper and longer-lasting its impression on the brain/mind.)

3.5 billion years of good for survival and reproduction being RIGHT, and bad for survival and reproduction being WRONG, built human bodies and brains from the ground up. This survival ‘morality’ ensured that a growing consciousness had a series of physical hosts through which to learn.

As the most fundamental driving force in our life, the struggle for survival shaped our body, brain and mind, and made us determined to understand ourselves and our environment. As the main driver of our intellectual development, the survival imperative naturally evolved into the need to explain everything scientifically.

Yet the fear of getting eaten isn’t only the bottom line incentive behind our need to figure things out; it’s actually our reason for living. Everything we are and do is in some measure a reflection of the instinctive drive to survive.

Of course ‘survival’ for us as conscious beings isn’t just about surviving as genes; it’s about the hyper-complex way our consciousness perceives the world and reality which includes our ideas and feelings about truth, justice, morality and decency. All the interrelated subtleties of modern life have their roots in the survival instinct; it’s more fundamental than our DNA and as unpredictable as our imagination. Whether we’re materialist or spiritual, that instinct informs everything we are and do. We live and learn from our experiences not simply so we can be more efficient survivors, but so we can be happier and more fulfilled ones. That includes a need to feel spiritually fulfilled.

Complicating this further is our need to ascribe ‘meaning’ to the contents of our personal reality. And as this too is driven by our personal need to survive, we don’t just use senses, mind and intelligence to decide what’s real and what’s not, we cheat to try and shape reality to suit ourselves. We have a degree of free will and so are able to choose which aspects of reality we’d like to be more real than others. In this way we’re constantly designing our own personal reality to satisfy a forever changing idea of what that reality should be. 

At this point I become more involved in the program when I see people justifying their feelings of envy, greed, anger or whatever simply because these traits help them survive in life’s jungle. I identify when greed becomes ‘ME getting what I need for MY survival.’ Anger becomes ‘ME being assertive for MYself.’ I feel resentment but tell myself ‘an injustice has been committed against ME.’ Revenge is ‘ME getting justice for myself.’ Jealousy turns into ‘I want material equality for ME’. Ditto envy. I pretend my mean-mindedness is ‘toughness’ and tell myself it’s admirable…

The message is, until human consciousness discovers its true purpose, it will go on thinking of itself as the body it occupies, and so continue devoting its energies to the survival of that body, and the replication and reproduction of its genes, rather than furthering its development as consciousness.